Introducing SDU Tools: Free T-SQL Tools for DBAs and Developers

I’ve worked with T-SQL for a very long time, and over the years I’ve lost count of how many tools I’ve found the need to create to help me in my work.

They have been in a variety of script folders, etc. and whenever I go to use them now, I often have to decide which is the best version of a particular tool, as they’ve also been refined over time.

So I decided to get them into a clean clear shape and SDU Tools was born. I’ve grabbed a whole bunch of tools for a start, made sure they are pretty consistent in the way they do things, and published them within a single script. I figured I might as well also share them with others. They are free (I get you to register so I know what usage they are getting).

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For each of the tools, I’ve also created a YouTube video that shows how to use the tool. I’m also planning to create blog posts for each tool so I have the opportunity to show things that won’t fit in a short video and ways of using them that might be less obvious.

I’ve got a big backlog of tools that I’d like to add so I’m intending to add in whichever ones I get reworked during each month. Likely areas in the upcoming months are further functions and procedures related to scripting objects, and also to code generation.

The tools ship as a single T-SQL script, don’t require SQLCLR or anything to clever, and are targeted at SQL Server 2008 and above. They are shipped as a single schema that you can place in whichever database (or databases) suits you best.

Of course there’s the usual rider that you use them at your own risk. If they don’t do what they should, I’ll be sad and then fix it, but that’s all Smile

I hope you find them useful.

You can find out more about our free SDU Tools here:

http://sqldownunder.com/sdu-tools

Enjoy !

Auto-Injection of Enterprise Edition Features

There’s an interesting scenario that’s come up in creating some new samples for SQL Server 2016.

I know that for many, many years people have asked for a way to limit developer edition to only use standard edition features, or at least to have a way to flag them. I’ve often thought that I’d like a way to set a “target environment” and have the colorization change anything that I can’t use in standard to an obviously different color.

However, previously, if you used developer edition to create a database, as long as you didn’t use any enterprise features, you could then backup and restore that database to a standard edition server.

That’s no longer the case with SQL Server 2016.

If you create a temporal table in a database on developer edition, it automatically chooses PAGE compression for the history file. There is also no DDL to avoid this. The database can no longer be restored on a standard edition server. To work around it, you would need to rebuild the table without compression after it’s created.

I see this as quite a change in behavior. I don’t think that features that are only available in enterprise (or other perhaps Azure) editions should be “auto-injected”.

Clearly, if you script out the database and create a new database on standard edition using the script, it will create the history table without compression. But I suspect that many people create DBs as starter DBs using developer edition, and then deploy them to other editions that don’t support compression.

I’d be interested in thoughts on how common this practice currently is.

SQL Down Under Podcast 68–Guest Joe Yong–SQL Server 2016 StretchDB

Hi Folks,

One of the intriguing options that’s coming as part of SQL Server 2016 is StretchDB. I’ve been spending some time working with it and learning about it, and I’ve ended up with lots of questions.

It was great to get an opportunity to speak to Joe Yong to get all my questions sorted.

Hope you’ll enjoy it too. You’ll find it here: http://sqldownunder.azurewebsites.net/Podcasts

R Tools for Visual Studio

In recent months, I’ve been brushing up my R skills. I’ve had a few areas of interest in this:

* R in Azure Machine Learning

* R in relation to Power BI and general analytics

* R embedded (somewhat) in SQL Server 2016

As a client tool, I’ve been using RStudio. It’s been good and very simple but it’s a completely separate environment. So I was excited when I saw there was to be a preview of new R tooling for Visual Studio.

I’ve been using a pre-release version of R Tools for Visual Studio for a short while but I’ve already come to quite like it. It’s great to have this embedded directly within Visual Studio. I can do everything that I used to do in RStudio but really like the level of Intellisense, etc. that I pick up when I’m working in R Tools for Visual Studio.

So today I was pleased to see the announcement that these tools have gone public. You’ll find more info here in today’s post from Shahrokh Mortazavi in the Azure Machine Learning blog: https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/machinelearning/2016/03/09/announcing-r-tools-for-visual-studio-2/

My Sessions from Ignite Australia on the Gold Coast now online

Hi Folks,

Couldn’t make it to Ignite? The team from Microsoft Australia recorded all the sessions and they are online now.

Here are the three sessions that I delivered:

 

Azure Datacamp Power Hour:   http://www.sqldownunder.com/links/5

Things I Wish Developers Knew About SQL Server: http://www.sqldownunder.com/links/6

Working With SQL Server Spatial: http://www.sqldownunder.com/links/7

 

Enjoy!

Data Camp Sydney (Free)

Hi Folks, on the 5th June (yes that’s Friday next week), I’m running a Data Camp day for the local Microsoft team. It’s being held at Cliftons in the city.

We’ve got four topics for  the day:

  • Azure SQL DB
  • Azure DocumentDB
  • Azure Machine Learning
  • Azure Stream Analytics

If you want to get your head around any/all of these, we’d love to see you there. Places are limited but you must register and can do so here: https://msevents.microsoft.com/CUI/EventDetail.aspx?EventID=1032627085&Culture=en-AU&community=0

Latest MVA Offerings for SQL Server and for Windows 10 (Yes it’s time to start looking at this)

The team at Microsoft Virtual Academy (MVA) have pushed out some new content that’s relevant to database people.

First, if you’re wondering about using Azure for SQL Server, the Jumpstart for SQL Server in Azure VMs is worth a look. Longer term, I suspect we’ll mostly end up using SQL Server as a platform service (Azure SQL DB) but in the short-term, implementing it in a VM will be more common as it’s probably both easier when migrating existing applications and a little more familiar to most.

Next, if you have to deal with other databases (shock horror, yes there are others including open source ones), there is a course on Open Source Databases on Azure.

Finally, you would have to have been living under a rock not to notice that Windows 10 is coming. But now, it’s time to start to get your head around what’s different. There’s a course that covers off the Fundamentals of the Technical Preview of Windows 10.

More Useful MVA Training Options

I find many of the MVA courses great for quickly getting across concepts or areas that I haven’t worked with before.

This month, the local MVP program has asked me to highlight the following MVA courses. The first two in particular look useful for SQL folk. The third one provides good background:

Azure IaaS Technical Fundamentals

Deep Dive into Networking Storage and Disaster Recovery Scenarios

Embracing Open Source Technologies to Accelerate and Scale Solutions

If you watch them, let me know what you think.

Azure Machine Learning Course–First Melbourne Offering

Hi Folks, we’ve been working hard on a new Azure Machine Learning course.

Come and spend a solid day finding out why Azure Machine Learning should be part of your arsenal.

Our first Melbourne offering of Azure Machine Learning Core Skills is 31st July. I’d love to see you there:

http://www.sqldownunder.com/Training/Courses/25